Spinoza, Industrialization, and the Nineteenth-Century Ethos of Repose

Professor Tracy Matysik traces philosophers' early critiques of capitalism and its breakneck pace, and finds a surprising remedy in Spinoza's ideas about God.

What Does It Mean to Be Heard?

Opportunity Grant winner Katja Schatte reflects on her time at the Voice of Witness Oral History training and its impact on her multimedia doctoral project centered on the voices of East German Jewish women.

By | March 30th, 2017|Categories: Grad Student Writing, Student Writing|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Prophets at War: Hermann Cohen and German Jews in the First World War

During World War I, philosopher Hermann Cohen argued that Jews could be true and full citizens of the new German nation-state. Many of his contemporaries, including other Jews, disagreed. Professor Michael Rosenthal explains.

The Importance of Welcoming Refugees

What years of interviewing Bosnian War refugees taught Professor Kathie Friedman, a sociologist in the Jackson School at the University of Washington.

By | December 9th, 2016|Categories: Featured, Global Judaism, Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , |1 Comment

Is It Time to Reconsider Marlowe’s and Shakespeare’s Jews?

New theories about Shakespeare's collaborative authorship could shed light on his portrayal of Jewish characters.

In Budapest, Experiencing How History Impacts Our Present

Halle Friedland, winner of a Jewish Studies Opportunity Grant, spent last winter in Hungary.

Tolerance Roundtable

Tolerance has meant inclusion and exclusion for Jews throughout history, writes Noam Pianko in this Introduction to our Fall Faculty Roundtable.

By | November 21st, 2016|Categories: Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Questions of Denial

Where is the line between truth and opinion? One among many questions raised at a recent screening of "Denial," about Deborah E. Lipstadt's court battle.