FAQs about Jewish Studies at the UW2018-05-29T12:02:29+00:00

FAQs about Jewish Studies at the UW

Q: Is Jewish Studies only for Jewish students?
A: Just as all academic programs at the UW–from French & Italian Studies to Asian Studies to American Indian Studies–are open to all students regardless of background, so too Jewish Studies welcomes any student interested in learning about culture from different perspectives. Studying the variety of Jewish cultures throughout history and their interaction with majority cultures offers a fascinating vantage point for the study of society, language, art, history, philosophy, and more, no matter one’s background or intended career path.

Q: Outside of courses, how can students get involved in Jewish Studies?
A: Students are welcome to attend programs and events offered by the Stroum Center for Jewish Studies. These events, the majority of which are free, range from lectures to films to cultural performances. Subscribe to the Stroum Center newsletter to learn more about upcoming events.

Undergraduate students from all backgrounds and majors who are interested in Jewish Studies are also invited to join the Jewish Studies Student Advisory Council (JSSAC), a non-religious and non-political RSO. At JSSAC meetings, students offer feedback about curriculum and courses, build leadership skills, make friends, and create community. The JSSAC meets a few times each quarter, and free dinner is provided at meetings. Email us for upcoming event dates.

Q. What study abroad opportunities are available for Jewish Studies students?
UW-approved study abroad programs–from Melbourne to Haifa to Prague to Grenada–offer courses transferable to the UW for Jewish Studies credit. Check with your adviser to confirm that specific courses will transfer.

Q: Is funding is available for Jewish Studies students?
Stroum Center Opportunity Grants offer up to $1500 to undergraduate students who participate in UW-approved study abroad programs with a focus on Jewish Studies or take intensive Jewish language courses domestically. Undergraduates do not need to be Jewish Studies majors or minors, and multiple grants are available. The grants are also available for graduate students conducting research in the field of Jewish Studies.