What does it mean to be a minority? Anti-Jewish violence in medieval Egypt offers insights for today

Popular ideas about what it means to be a minority may change, but incidents of state-sanctioned violence remain eerily similar across millennia, explains Hazel D. Cole Fellow Brendan Goldman, a historian of the medieval Islamic world.

Maja Haderlap, Jewish writers, and telling the story of ethnic Slovenians in Austria using the “language of the enemy”

Like German-language Jewish writers, ethnic Slovenian author Maja Haderlap struggles with the language of the Nazis in telling the story of her community's persecution in Austria, writes graduate fellow Aaron Carpenter.

Mosaics of the Abraham & Isaac story show how Jews in late antiquity used art to connect with religion and community

Countering misperceptions, grad fellow Abby Massarano explains that Jews in the 6th century CE embraced visual art, and shows what we can learn about these communities from their depictions of the key story of Abraham's Binding of Isaac.

The Jews of medieval Iraq and Kurdistan: Surprising insights from Rabbi Benjamin of Tudela’s 12th-century geography

Rabbi Benjamin of Tudela's travel writing shows that Jews in medieval Iraq and Kurdistan lived in (relative) peace and freedom, countering narratives of universal misery and oppression, grad fellow Jeffrey Haines writes.

Learning from the history of Ottoman Jews & 19th-century cholera outbreaks during COVID-19

Grad fellow Canan Bolel explains the unfortunate parallels between responses to 19th-century cholera outbreaks in Ottoman Izmir (present-day Turkey) — especially for Jewish communities— and responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Go to Top