Reproduction in the 19th-century Ottoman Empire: The story of the “bloodstained” Jewish midwives

Concern over a shrinking population led Ottoman authorities to undermine reproductive autonomy in the 19th century, writes grad fellow Büşra Demirkol, starting with outlawing abortion and exiling two "bloody" Jewish midwives.

PODCAST | Jewish Questions, Episode 3: Being Jewish in Medieval Spain — Ana Gómez-Bravo

Has anti-Semitism always been the same, or have ideas about Jewishness, and suspicion towards Jews, changed over time? In this episode, guest Ana Gómez-Bravo helps to answer these questions by looking at the lives of Jews and “conversos” (Jewish converts to Christianity) in medieval Spain, exploring how Catholic authorities tried to define and restrict their Jewish and converso residents.

How Jewish residents of Seattle remembered the Armenian massacres in the Ottoman Empire

Looking at how Sephardic Jews in Seattle recalled massacres of Armenians in Ottoman Turkey shows why it's important to go beyond "good guys" and "bad guys" in interpreting history, writes graduate fellow Oya Rose Aktaş.