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So far Stroum Center Admin has created 167 blog entries.

From Rhodes to Racine: Why a Sephardic Teenager in 20th-Century Paris Was Reading the Tragedy Esther

What can a quote from Racine's play Esther tell us about what it was like to be a young Jewish woman in 20th century France?

By | June 9th, 2017|Categories: Global Judaism, Grad Student Writing, Sephardic Studies|0 Comments

After Memorial Day: Putting the Israeli Culture of Commemoration in a Comparative Perspective

Opportunity Grant winner Anat Goldman reflects on the similarities and challenges of national moments of commemoration in Israel and Turkey.

By | June 7th, 2017|Categories: Grad Student Writing, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

To Seattle from the Belgian Congo via Tel Aviv

Oscar Olivier was forced to flee the Belgian Congo in search of a stable life. His story weaves together the pursuit of freedom and justice, the power of resistance, and embracing of his Jewish past.

Spinoza, Industrialization, and the Nineteenth-Century Ethos of Repose

Professor Tracy Matysik traces philosophers' early critiques of capitalism and its breakneck pace, and finds a surprising remedy in Spinoza's ideas about God.

Welcome Constanze Kolbe, the Stroum Center’s 2017-2018 Hazel D. Cole Fellow

Welcome Constanze Kolbe, the Stroum Center's 2017-2018 Hazel D. Cole Fellow.

By | May 4th, 2017|Categories: News|0 Comments

Bethlehem for Christmas

Visiting Bethlehem on Christmas, Stroum Center Graduate Fellow Emily Gade discovers some interesting cultural commingling.

Reimagining Sephardic Çanakkale and its Ties to Seattle

Stroum Center Opportunity Grant winner Ozgur Ozkan reflects on the ties between Çanakkale, Turkey, and Sephardic Seattle.

By | May 1st, 2017|Categories: Grad Student Writing, Sephardic Studies, Uncategorized|2 Comments

The Haskalah: Jewish Modernity & Shame

Professor Yitzhak Melamed argues that the German Jewish Enlightenment movement, the Haskalah, was motivated by a profound sense of shame.