Is toleration possible in a liberal society?

In Michael Rosenthal's view, modern liberal society both benefits and is challenged by the ideal of toleration promoted by Baruch Spinoza.

By | January 5th, 2017|Categories: Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , |0 Comments

The Importance of Welcoming Refugees

What years of interviewing Bosnian War refugees taught Professor Kathie Friedman, a sociologist in the Jackson School at the University of Washington.

By | December 9th, 2016|Categories: Featured, Global Judaism, Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , |1 Comment

Jews, Muslims, and the Limits of Tolerance

Non-Muslims were accepted in the Ottoman Empire, but the tolerance policy for Jews had limits. Devin E. Naar suggests why tolerance is a double-edged idea.

Tolerance Roundtable

Tolerance has meant inclusion and exclusion for Jews throughout history, writes Noam Pianko in this Introduction to our Fall Faculty Roundtable.

By | November 21st, 2016|Categories: Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

My father was a refugee. Here’s why the immigration conversation matters.

Michael Rosenthal considers key moral and political questions on immigration. Join him for a 10/27 panel on this topic.

Michael Rosenthal, scholar of Spinoza, becomes new Stroum Chair

Michael Rosenthal, expert in early modern philosophy, will plan a Spinoza conference and seminars on core texts in his role as the new Stroum Chair at UW.

By | June 16th, 2016|Categories: Jewish History & Thought, News|Tags: |1 Comment

Freud, Said, and the Question of Jewish Identity after the Holocaust

Religious identity was not part of Nick Barr Clingan’s Seattle upbringing, but a recent discovery about his family's past shifted his perspective.

Lessons in Solidarity at Seattle’s New Holocaust Center for Humanity

Katja Schatte unpacks the Holocaust Center's mission to teach about Jewish suffering as well as human rights.