What can literary scholars working in the field of Jewish Studies teach us about how to survive (and resist) the Trump Era? A lot, it seems.

It’s no secret that humanities scholars have spent the past few decades forced to justify their value, but in the Age of Trump, their role beyond the ivory tower is more important than ever.

From Rhodes to Racine: Why a Sephardic Teenager in 20th-Century Paris Was Reading the Tragedy Esther

What can a quote from Racine's play Esther tell us about what it was like to be a young Jewish woman in 20th century France?

Crossing the Red Sea in Ladino: A Rare Sephardic Passover Ballad

A rare Ladino ballad for the last day of Passover sung by Mr. Leo Azose a native of Mármara.

Are You a Foreigner? The Power of a Name

Berkay Gulen, a Stroum Center Opportunity Grant winner, reflects on the power of one's name in a review of Rita Ender's "To Live on With One's Name"

By | February 21st, 2017|Categories: Global Judaism, Grad Student Writing|Tags: |0 Comments

Expanding My Jewish Studies Horizons in Australia

Yarrow Linden, a Jewish Studies minor, spent last autumn in Australia with the support of an Opportunity Grant. Hear about her adventures!

By | January 31st, 2017|Categories: Global Judaism, Personal History, Student Writing|Tags: |0 Comments

Prophets at War: Hermann Cohen and German Jews in the First World War

During World War I, philosopher Hermann Cohen argued that Jews could be true and full citizens of the new German nation-state. Many of his contemporaries, including other Jews, disagreed. Professor Michael Rosenthal explains.

Manna from heaven: Bumuelos, a Sephardic Hanukkah treat

Tracing a Sephardic holiday dessert from the Sinai desert to the shores of Seattle.

The Importance of Welcoming Refugees

What years of interviewing Bosnian War refugees taught Professor Kathie Friedman, a sociologist in the Jackson School at the University of Washington.

By | December 9th, 2016|Categories: Featured, Global Judaism, Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , |1 Comment