Jewish Modernity & Shame

Professor Yitzhak Melamed argues that the German Jewish Enlightenment movement, the Haskalah, was motivated by a profound sense of shame.

How Did the Enlightenment Shape the Jews?

2017 Stroum Lecturer Jonathan Israel explores how Enlightenment thinkers both fueled anti-Semitism and created greater space for Jewish people in society.

Spinoza on the Divinity of Scripture

Does it matter if scripture is divine? Spinoza expert Steven Nadler weighs in on the philosopher's ideas about the Bible.

Should the Ban on Spinoza Be Lifted?

Is heresy still a meaningful concept in American Judaism? Daniel Schwartz argues that the discussions Spinoza inspires are more relevant than ever.

By | February 1st, 2017|Categories: Jewish History & Thought, Spinoza & Modern Jewish Philosophy|0 Comments

Prophets at War: Hermann Cohen and German Jews in the First World War

During World War I, philosopher Hermann Cohen argued that Jews could be true and full citizens of the new German nation-state. Many of his contemporaries, including other Jews, disagreed. Professor Michael Rosenthal explains.

Teaching the Politics of Migration

This year's Jacobovitz Fellow, Oded Oron, studies the experiences of migrants in Israel and Washington state.

By | January 11th, 2017|Categories: Grad Student Writing, Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , |0 Comments

Is toleration possible in a liberal society?

In Michael Rosenthal's view, modern liberal society both benefits and is challenged by the ideal of toleration promoted by Baruch Spinoza.

By | January 5th, 2017|Categories: Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , |0 Comments

The Importance of Welcoming Refugees

What years of interviewing Bosnian War refugees taught Professor Kathie Friedman, a sociologist in the Jackson School at the University of Washington.

By | December 9th, 2016|Categories: Featured, Global Judaism, Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , |1 Comment