Spinoza on the Divinity of Scripture

Steven Nadler, a Spinoza expert at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, explains that the Bible's divine nature lies in its moral teachings.

Should the Ban on Spinoza Be Lifted?

Is heresy still a meaningful concept in American Judaism? Daniel Schwartz of The George Washington University argues that the discussions Spinoza inspires are more relevant than ever.

By | February 1st, 2017|Categories: Jewish History & Thought, Spinoza & Modern Jewish Philosophy|0 Comments

Prophets at War: Hermann Cohen and German Jews in the First World War

The debates among German Jewish philosophers during World War I reflect vastly different views on Jewish identity and national belonging.

Teaching the Politics of Migration

This year's Jacobovitz Fellow, Oded Oron, studies the experiences of migrants in Israel and Washington state.

By | January 11th, 2017|Categories: Grad Student Writing, Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , |0 Comments

Is toleration possible in a liberal society?

In Michael Rosenthal's view, modern liberal society both benefits and is challenged by the ideal of toleration promoted by Baruch Spinoza.

By | January 5th, 2017|Categories: Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , |0 Comments

The Importance of Welcoming Refugees

What years of interviewing Bosnian War refugees taught Professor Kathie Friedman, a sociologist in the Jackson School at the University of Washington.

By | December 9th, 2016|Categories: Featured, Global Judaism, Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , |1 Comment

Jews, Muslims, and the Limits of Tolerance

Non-Muslims were accepted in the Ottoman Empire, but the tolerance policy for Jews had limits. Devin E. Naar suggests why tolerance is a double-edged idea.

Tolerance Roundtable

Tolerance has meant inclusion and exclusion for Jews throughout history, writes Noam Pianko in this Introduction to our Fall Faculty Roundtable.

By | November 21st, 2016|Categories: Jewish History & Thought|Tags: , , , |0 Comments